Vol.2. No.3 2013

Volume 2. Issue 3. April 2013.

Contents

  1. Jon Chang (University of Manchester) and Jae Park (Hong Kong Institute of Education)  Soviet Koreans: Redemption through Labour and Sport.
  2. Jeff Higley (Arcadia University, London; Artist; Musician) Voices of the Land.
  3. Steve Itugbu (School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London) Nigeria’s Democratic Insouciance.
  4. Farda Asadov (Visiting Research Scholar, Near Eastern Studies, Princeton University). Khazar Studies locked between scarcity of Research Sources and Contemporary Policy Concerns.

The Articles

Jon Chang (University of Manchester) and Jae Park (Hong Kong Institute of Education) Soviet Koreans: Redemption through Labour and Sport.

Abstract:

Koreans in the Russian Far East were deported to Central Asia in 1937-38 as ‘potential fifth columnists’, ‘suspicious’ or as an ‘unreliable’ people. This article chronicles their struggles to resettle and establish new lives through labour and sport as a Soviet nationality. The article also covers the period of 1940-1979 and the role of football in Soviet life, as part of the ‘defence’ of the Soviet Union (oborona) and its role in Soviet Korean life. Life in the post Second World War era was clearly one where Russians were ‘primus inter pares’ among all Soviet nationalities. This article establishes that the rise of Soviet sport was financed by the productivity of the working peoples of Central Asia in particular the Korean kolkhozes of Uzbekistan. However, even Soviet sport had its biases or preferences. The field of ‘sport’ is influenced by each society’s views, hierarchies and socio-politics and yet, each society can be changed and influenced by ‘new agents’ wielding their particular habitus. After the Second World War, Koreans in Soviet sports were regarded as an ‘unknown quantity’ but typically being of a smaller and a shorter stature, they were not viewed as having as much ‘potential’ in competitive sports as that of Russians, Tatars, Ukrainians and others. Interviews and oral history with the first Korean pioneers in football such as Dmitrii An, Il He and Anton Yoon presented the challenges, setbacks and successes that they faced and overcame. In the end, the Koreans of Central Asia and Politotdel deconstructed the official confines and meaning(s) of sport and labour and infused this ‘cultural field’ with their individual and collective habitus and Korean ‘agency’ which displayed a truer, more inclusive sense of the USSR as a polity of many equal nations (nationalities) and Soviet ‘internationalism.’

Keywords: Koreans, Soviet sport, football, nationalities deportations.

PDF Article available here: 

Jon C Jae P Soviet Koreans-Redemption FINAL Vers REVISED

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Jeff Higley (Arcadia University, London; Artist) Voices of the Land.

Abstract:

Jeff Higley went on a trip to Mongolia in search of the mythical ‘Sound Mountain’. He did not find the mountain, but instead he discovered the age-old connection between the landscape and the music and song it inspires in its people.

Keywords: Mongolia, music, sound, Central Asian throat-singing, yurt, morin and khurr.

PDF Article available here:

Jeff Higley -TESS EURASIA JOURNAL Vol 2 No 3 April 2013

An example of throat singing-Khoomii singing (and the instrument used, the morin khurr) mentioned in Jeff’s article is available here: http://www.soundtransformations.co.uk/

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Steve Itugbu (School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London) Nigeria’s Democratic Insouciance.

Abstract:

Due to the outstanding euphoria that greeted the re-introduction of democracy after more than a decade of military dictatorship, Nigeria has been hailed as an African democratic state. This article rejects this notion and instead attempts to build and proffer alternative models as a way forward for Nigeria. It argues that from 1999 until the future, Nigeria still lacks the defining traits of a democracy amidst the under-representation of the people’s will. It is hence argued that the underlying dangers of not linking up socio-economic development to democracy should not be underestimated. The paper further canvasses for a new generation of progressive leaders that could establish initiatives to spur changes couched within six core principles–fiscal discipline, far-reaching electoral reforms, good governance, leadership characterised by determinism, socio-economic development and citizen participation.

Keywords: Nigeria, democracy, reform, politics, elites.

PDF Available here:

Steve Itugbu – TESS EURASIA JOURNAL Vol 2 No 3 April 2013

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Farda Asadov (Visiting Research Scholar, Near Eastern Studies, Princeton University). Khazar Studies locked between scarcity of Research Sources and Contemporary Policy Concerns.

Abstract:

The article presents the basic controversies in the evolution of  Khazar Studies – the history of Turkic people who adopted Judaism and contested the power of Arab caliphate and Byzantine in 7th-9th centuries AD. Challenges of contemporary policy used and continue to affect this field of scholarship evidently more than many other fields of mediaeval studies. The outcome postulated in the article is  that insightful study of Khazar history continues being dependent UPON political circumstances and is closely related to on-going  transformation of contemporary societies of the region towards human rights oriented policy and respect to cultural pluralism.

Keywords: Khazars, Khaganate, Eurasia, Khazaria, politics.

PDF Article available here:

Farda Asadov – TESS EURASIA JOURNAL Vol 2 No 3 April 2013

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